CIO New Jersey Summit | October 9, 2018 | Newark, NJ, USA

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - CIO New Jersey Summit

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:40 am

Keynote Presentation

The Future of the CIO in the Coming Digital Economy

As more businesses undergo a digital transformation, and as those digital transformations become more ingrained into organizational culture, "Digital" becomes not something unique and different from the business, but a core component of every aspect of the business. As this shift occurs, IT itself faces the very real possibility of no longer being something unique from the business, but instead a component of every aspect of the business. In this world, what role then exists for the CIO? Two clear paths are presenting themselves - one leads to a focus on infrastructure and integration, to keeping the lights on for the digital innovators, while the other leads to information and innovation itself. Knowing which path to choose, how to choose it, and how to see it through will be one of the greatest challenges CIOs of this era will face.

Takeaways:

  • Change is, if not already here, certainly coming and CIOs who don't prepare for the change may not like the results when it arrives
  • Digital transformation is all about connecting enterprise systems to information technology to drive productivity and performance improvements
  • Be prepared to tackle the tasks that no-one wants to do, but everyone needs done; establish relevance to cultivate importance
 

8:45 am - 9:15 am

Keynote Presentation

IT Integration in a Distributed IT World

It's no secret " the integration of disparate systems, disparate applications, and disparate data stores has long been one of the biggest challenges faced by the IT department. Simply put, getting everything to talk to everything is no easy task. The rapid adoption of cloud delivered services has compounded this problem almost exponentially " if it was hard to integrate when you controlled the whole stack it has become nearly impossible when you control very little of it. To be efficient and effective IT departments need to adopt a new model of system, application, and data integration. Endless webs of one-off point-to-point integrations simply won't cut it anymore and a purposeful, structured approach is required.

Takeaways:

  • Learn how to build a holistic strategy to integrate systems, applications, and data
  • Understand how to leverage SOA and ESB to streamline app to app communications
  • Discover the power and impact of holistic Master Data Management and other data integration processes
 

9:20 am - 9:45 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Become a Change Agent for Business Transformation

Today's modern CIO is embarking on a digital transformation journey exploring radical hybrid IT strategies and leveraging new technologies like Cloud, Social, Mobile and Big Data. However, with 'keeping the lights on' legacy IT components costing nearly 90% of a typical IT budget, how can IT make powerful advancements and lead business change? 

Join this interactive session to learn how award-winning CIOs are successfully tipping the balance by liberating people, time and money from costly ongoing maintenance of their ERP systems including SAP and Oracle, to invest in strategic initiatives that create real-world competitive advantage.

 

9:50 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Capacity Planning as Competitive Differentiator

Capacity planning has in many ways become a lost art; common during the era of the mainframe when resources were expensive and time-consuming to procure, the advent of the inexpensive pizza box Windows Server has relegated planning, replacing it with a just buy more mentality. But just buy more creates more problems than it solves as server sprawl, server management, and rampant overprovisioning issues quickly erode any aspect of the value that IT tries to deliver. The lost art need to be rediscovered, to allow IT to get back to offering truly efficient and effective service and service levels. This new era of capacity planning requires new tools that go beyond simplistic benchmarking and trending analysis and instead provides dynamic, flexible, and predictive modeling that allows IT department to truly deploy optimized IT services. 

Takeaways: 

  • Capacity management may have fallen out of favor but its abandonment has created a wealth of problems for IT and business users the world over 
  • In an era of intense innovation pressure, enterprises can no longer afford the inefficiencies of a just buy more approach to capacity provisioning 
  • Traditional capacity planning techniques certainly have value but dynamic modeling based on predictive analytics takes things to a whole new level

Executive Boardroom

Proving the ROI of IoT

We all know that ROI calculations, on the surface, are simple mathematical formulas: compare the cost of investment against the value of the return over a given and agreed upon period. But determining exactly what each side of the equation entails and totals is the challenging part, and nowhere moreso than in burgeoning areas such as IoT adoption where use cases are still not clearly understood, and technology costs are highly variable, and all the components related to cost may not yet be quantifiable. The benefits are there, as a number of enterprises are discovering with early pilot programs, but CIOs must enter this area with their eyes wide open to ensure that early IoT implementations have the ROI necessary to keep more complex projects moving forward.

Takeaways:

  • Costs must be carefully quantified for any IoT project " it's not just the sensors, but networking, data, security, etc. spend must be taken into account
  • Similarly, value must be clearly established both in isolation and in comparison to any more traditional methods that could be used
  • Successful IoT projects will be those that can initially leverage existing spend to mitigate costs with successive project piggybacking on earlier investments
 

10:20 am - 10:30 am

Morning Networking Coffee Break

 

10:35 am - 11:00 am

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Evolving From Legacy To Achieve Digital Transformation

For most IT organizations, the way to get there is through a digital transformation framework, which produces a radically different and modern approach to technology and support that is based on a principle of business agility. It emphasizes moving quickly to adjust to the way the customer in the global techno-society wants to interact. 

Digital transformation requires a new business operating vision and a strategy on how to deliver that vision. includes technology infrastructure, tools, applications, communications, staff capabilities, staff competencies and more. The CIO has to work closely with corporate planning to define the type of support that will be needed and how the technology infrastructure and capability will evolve and to create a flexible investment plan that can be adjusted over time. Key elements must include the redesign of the technology infrastructure to reduce complexity and cost while increasing scalability, a rethinking of how business and IT work together, and an ability to quickly adopt and integrate new advanced technologies. 

Until recently, this goal has been almost impossible to achieve, because few companies have the ability to replace legacy infrastructure and applications. And it has been almost impossible to unlock legacy functionality and data for use with modern technology.


Think Tank

IoT and IT/OT

M2M type technologies. In many cases these older industrial automation initiatives used proprietary communications protocols and dedicated sensors that interfaced with controllers that could manage communications between IT and OT platforms. Fast forward to an IoT world however and these sensors and controllers will need to natively speak IP, natively integrate to back-end enterprise systems beyond just simple controllers, systems such as ERP, BI and other core platforms. Navigating the complexity of process, data, security, and functionality implications has the potential to be a minefield for the unwitting IT executive that goes in without eyes wide open. 

Takeaways:  

  • IT/OT integration is a low-hanging fruit area for IoT adoption 
  • Existing investments into older M2M IT/OT integrations however can erode any potential value 
  • Before investing in IoT enabled IT/OT integration careful consideration must be made of the implications and whether value can be realized - does the investment justify the returns over what is already in place?

 

11:05 am - 11:30 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Built to Change and Built to Last: How to Balance Culture, Skills, and Tech with Customer Expectations in the Fast-Changing Digital World

Tech has changed the way experiences and products are consumed - which means businesses have to change the way they deliver. Companies that have been around for decades are disappearing overnight, and startups with completely disruptive business models are bought and sold at the drop of a hat. The market today is made up of large, established enterprises and new challengers entering the market with nothing to lose - and they each want what the other has: a solid customer base, revenue and profit versus innovation, disruption and new talent. Companies who come out on top will be able to connect people, processes and technology with customer needs to translate experiences into real business value. This means balancing established industry experience with the new culture, skills, and insights required to compete in today's business landscape. 

Key Takeaways:

  • Embrace digital transformation, using technology to create an environment for incremental change while balancing innovation and governance at all levels of the organization. 
  • Create an agile business model that blends an organization's legacy approach with the expectations of the market and more importantly, customers, so that you're less likely to fall back on the excuse of "this is how we've always done it" when challenged. 
  • Build the right culture with people who are focused on continuous improvement, want to deliver amazing customer experiences, and wake up every day looking for ways to break down barriers between ideas and outcomes.
 

11:35 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Disaster Recovery and Preparing for the Inevitable

Like death and taxes, IT outages are an inevitability whether as the result of power loss, telecommunications outage, or any one of a myriad other potential technical and non-technical issues. In this environment, the savvy CIO knows that what matters most is preparation " being ready for that next outage with an IT infrastructure that is both resilient and flexible and Disaster Recovery procedures that allow for efficient and effective recovery, balancing Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives with appropriate cost. Disasters happen but with proper planning they don't have to be disastrous to your business.

Takeaways:

  • In the event of a severe outage, businesses without a Disaster Recovery plan are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to recoverability and viability
  • DR planning cannot be an at all costs proposition and appropriate planning must take into account reasonable Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives
  • Catastrophic outages get the press but are the thin end of the wedge " minor service interruptions are far more common and must be planned for as well

Executive Boardroom

Big Data is all about the Cloud

Of the four disruptive technologies, Cloud and Big Data are the two most top of mind for CIOs, the former because it has the potential to enhance agility and productivity while enabling efficiencies and reducing costs and the latter because it derives insights that drive competitive advantage and increases revenues. As the two continue to grow in relevance and importance to enterprise IT, and indeed to the enterprise as whole, it is only natural that they begin to intersect with the cloud becoming the optimal platform for the delivery of Big Data capabilities, either in-house through the use of IaaS/PaaS or out-of-house through SaaS or Analytics as a Service. IT departments and the CIOs that lead them then need to look to their Big Data and Cloud strategies and determine how best to align them to leverage the advantages where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud computing is a fundamental enabler of big data and advanced analytics capabilities
  • IT can, and must, become a leader in enterprise analytical capabilities by becoming a broker of cloud services
  • Cloud can benefit big data and analytics in a variety of ways with a variety of different delivery models each scaled to individual needs
 

12:05 pm - 12:30 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Big Data Analytics and the Impact on Fraud

Financial fraud is, unfortunately a huge business, with annual losses so massive that were Fraud a country, it would have the fifth highest global GDP. While enterprises in the financial services sector have always used analytical processes to detect and limit those losses, as technology moves forward the analytical capabilities that can be brought to bear increase in exponentially in capability and those on the leading edge are able to see, and stop, more fraud in less time. Just as Big Data capabilities are bringing significant business benefit to other aspects of the business, they can to fraud mitigation but several challenges need to be overcome for maximum efficiency. Only by addressing quality, volume, security, and integration challenges and by further ensuring the right staff with the right skills are in place can benefits actually be realized. 

Takeaways:  

  • The increased use of unmanned technology combined with ever quicker financial transaction processing has created a world ripe for the proliferation of fraud  
  • In a fight fire with fire approach, those same machine learning approaches can be repurposed to analyze transactions looking for the needle in the needlestack that is the illicit one  
  • A Big Data approach only works with the right foundation; garbage in garbage out has never been more true and data and process rigor is essential to success

Think Tank

Artificial Intelligence and the Rise of Advanced Machine Learning

Often times the terms "Artificial Intelligence" and "Advanced Machine Learning" are thought of interchangeably and while there is a relationship between AI and AML, to say they are the same thing is an oversimplification and misclassification. Rather the one begets the other with AI being the basic principle upon which AML is developed. As AI begins to mature and migrate away from purely advanced mathematical operations into decision making paradigms, AML steps forward as the predictive ability of machines to process vast quantities of data for the purposes of making decisions in ways that first mimic, but ultimately surpass (in terms of speed at the very least) those of humans. As data and analytics becomes foundational to the way every business operates, AI and AML will become foundational capabilities.

Takeaways:

  • While initial focus of AML decision making will be focused on binary decision making (i.e. Yes/No) ongoing advancements will move things to the next level
  • AI and AML are foundationally based on data and analytics -if these capabilities are not strong for you yet, investment is required
  • The possibilities with AML are potentially boundless, with autonomous cars the most publicly visible at this point, from which every industry can benefit


 

12:35 pm - 1:20 pm

Networking Luncheon

 

1:25 pm - 1:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Moving from Operations to Transformations

The accepted number for the amount of the IT budget that is tied up in operational spend, in paying to maintain technology that has already been purchased, is 80% leaving only 20% for the IT department to use to drive new projects. Because this level of funding is so low, as much as 70% of IT sponsored projects fail. Yet IT departments are being constantly pushed to be innovative, to find a way to embrace new technologies and leverage them to drive business change. How can you do that when your time, money, and effort goes to just keeping the lights on? Join us as we collectively explore this issue and examine some of the successful strategies that are being leveraged by top IT leaders.

Takeaways:

  • The pressure on CIO's to drive change has never been higher, but fortunately neither has the opportunity to do so
  • Disruptive technologies don't just have the power to disrupt IT for the worse, they have the power to disrupt the business for the better
  • Fortune favors the bold; now is the time to take a leap into new modes of business to break the operational spend stranglehold

Think Tank

Big Data, Small Data, and all the Data in Between

Increasingly over the last several years the term Big Data has become prevalent, to the point that it is invariably all anyone thinks of when data is mentioned at all. Often what we think of when we use the term Big Data is actually unstructured data " all the new data forms that enterprises have never collected before and are being overwhelmed by the possibilities of. But big/unstructured data is by no means the only data enterprises have and core structured or small data is often still the most relevant and valuable data an enterprise owns. As we collectively push forward into a more analytics-centric and therefore data-centric world what we need is a considered all-data strategy, one that incorporates big data, small data, master data, and meta data.

Takeaways:

  • While Big Data is valuable, so is the rest of the data that an enterprise owns and consistent focus must be applied to all data forms and types
  • A holistic data strategy that considers and the balances the needs of all data structures, types, needs, uses, and owners is essential for efficient and effective data operations
  • For business that have not yet invested in Master Data Management, such a program is the ideal foundation for building a comprehensive data program
 

1:55 pm - 2:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Fireside Chat

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a buy by the drink model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside " as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they've been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful
 

2:25 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Sourcing Enabled Business Transformation

Innovation is more than just a buzzword; it's fast becoming the mantra by which successful companies live. As enterprises strive to become ever more agile, offloading mundane responsibilities to sourcing partners can free the resources to become innovative. While beneficial, this really only scratches the surface as it still requires and relies on your resources to undertake that innovation journey. Partners that can bring innovation wherewithal to the table however, that can bake it directly into the service offering provide a greater opportunity to innovate. Understanding how such services can be integrated into your day to day operations, how they can spring board your innovation efforts, and how they can allow you to become truly transformational is essential to innovation success.

Takeaways:

  • Transformational innovation often requires knowledge, insight, and data that you simply don't have the access to yourself
  • A strong partner not only provides the opportunity to innovate, it also provides the resources to help make it happen
  • By leveraging a single for both operational and transformational initiatives, significant economies of scale can be leveraged making innovation easier

Executive Boardroom

Defining Data Governance

Data volume, data variety, and data velocity have all grown exponentially over the last few years, the so-called Big Data explosion. And while this increased organizational focus on data, the information it contains, and the insights that can be gleaned from it promises tremendous opportunity, that opportunity isn't achieved without overcoming significant challenges. Whether it be the increased need for better data quality (an issue unresolved from the small data days), more efficient and effective data management, answering questions around data ownership vs. stewardship, or even increased regulatory pressure as a result of data security and data privacy, this increased focus on data has created an increased need for Data Governance. Join our panelists as we discuss the thorny issue of Data Governance: what it is, how it works, why you need it, and who should be responsible for it.

Takeaways:

  • Data management issues have existed as long as data has existed but the Big Data boom has increased these challenges exponentially
  • Resolving data management issues requires a strong data governance program to make rules, resolve issues, and enforce compliance
  • Determining what to about data governance is the easy part, determining how and by whom it should be done will be the real challenge facing IT
 

2:55 pm - 3:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

The Unbearable Lightness of Digital Transformation

Building a Disruptive Technology Digital team. To become fully digital enterprises, you need to shift the focus inward and innovate the employee experience. Is this defined as how employees feel about their organizations with regard to both opportunities for growth/skills development, and employees' willingness to continue to work for their current firms? Use digital DNA behaviors. 

Takeaways: 

  • Look after -Capability Planning, Innovation, Strategic Intelligence, Predictive Analytics, Disruptive Technology, Enterprise Architecture, Strategic Roadmap, M&A, Patents and Communication.

Think Tank

The Evolution of the Private Cloud

Once upon a time applications ran directly on physical hardware. Then the boxes got bigger and more capable and multiple applications were run on the same hardware. There were some resource constraints, but things in general became more efficient. Time passed, things evolved and virtualization was introduced, allowing enterprises to run even more applications even more efficiently on the same hardware. And then the cloud came on the scene, extending the virtualization model to the point that it looked like something completely different, to the point that it became true utility computing. Cloud computing is not just virtualization on a bigger scale and as CIOs prepare their organizations to dive into private clouds at an increasing rate, it is very important to understand what they are and are not, and how they differ from their forbear computer models with which we are all familiar.

Takeaways:

  • Private clouds are big and becoming bigger, but calling something a private cloud and having it actually be one are different things
  • While virtualization may be a core enabling technology of a private cloud, virtualizing an environment doesn't make it a cloud
  • True private clouds have both pros and cons in relation to other compute models; they are not the be-all and end-all and careful consideration needs to be given before pushing ahead with private cloud deployment
 

3:25 pm - 3:35 pm

Afternoon Networking Coffee Break

 

3:40 pm - 4:05 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Innovation Showcase

An exclusive opportunity to be exposed to the hottest new solutions providers in a quick-hit format designed to whet the appetite and spark immediate interest.
 

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Disrupting Markets with Disruptive Technologies

While the combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud have been present and disrupting IT departments and enterprises as a whole for over two years now, in many ways organizations have still not fully embraced them, have still not fully leveraged them. These new platforms allow organizations radically new ways to go to market, allowing for broad scale deployment of systems of engagement that create dynamic relationships with clients and prospects. Finding the resources, wherewithal, and ability to fully commit to these technologies and the capabilities they create has proven to be a struggle for many, but a struggle that can be overcome by leveraging the right partners that bring the right skills and experiences to bear.

Takeaways:

  • Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud are all here to stay; each one adds value to enterprises but collectively that value increases exponentially
  • The manner in which these technologies are implemented, operated, and utilized is different than the foregoing systems of record we are used to
  • Unique skills and capabilities are required to leverage the power and value of these platforms, skills and capabilities that can be in short supply

Think Tank

Cloud Adoption Challenges on a Macro Level

The hype around the cloud is pervasive and can be potentially overwhelming but numerous studies have shown that tangible benefits can be had, whether in cost savings, efficiency improvements, or flexibility enhancements. That said numerous impediments exist to not just realizing that value, but even considering adoption; regulatory issues, integration challenges, business process revamp, and a dozen other challenges can halt cloud projects in their tracks before they get off the ground. In this group discussion we'll explore those inhibitors, understanding which challenges prevent adoption and what can be done to overcome them.

Takeaways:

  • The cloud presents a significant opportunity to organizations and while most have adopted in some form or other, wholesale adoption still lags
  • To realize benefits enterprises must deal with a variety of challenges each one requiring different solutions
  • Industry by industry adoption is constrained for different reasons but do common solutions exist that can resolve issues across the board?
 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

Executive Visions

Facilitating Technology-Enabled Business Transformation

The role of the modern IT Executive is more complex than it has ever been before, not just because the technology landscape has become more complex, but also because increasingly IT execs have had to become a business-focused executive, not just a technologist. Long have we talked about the CIO and CISO getting a seat at the table but modern businesses are now demanding that their technology impresario join them and leverage his deep and rich technical acumen to allow the organization as a whole to better position itself for market-place success. To be successful, CxOs need to invest in themselves, in their personnel, and in the right technologies to allow them to position the IT department to proactively address business needs as an innovator and driver, rather than order-taker and enabler.

Takeaways:

  • IT leadership can no longer be simply technology focused, but must instead take their visibility into business process and become business focused
  • A broader business-focus does not preclude maintaining technology excellence however and indeed may demand more of it than ever before
  • Success for CxOs will be measured not in how they can enable enterprise decisions, but in how they can drive growth
 

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception